The Co-Teaching Relationship

Find a job you enjoy doing and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

                                                                       – Mark Twain

Teaching and parenting are incredibly enjoyable. They are both also LOADS of work! If the above quote has you reflecting on your own teaching practice or parenting satisfaction then you are not alone. It is human nature to immediately jump into assessing our own well-being and feelings. We were wired that way for survival. In today’s day and age we are afforded many luxuries and ways of life that allow us to focus less on our survival and more on our contributions to this magnificent world that we are part of. In teaching, this means focusing not just on our own practice, but involving others and really participating in a team, such as in co-teaching.

Co-teaching may be a choice for you or something that your school or childcare center has designed. Either way, you are probably initially thinking about how your co-teaching relationship will impact your ability to do your job, your happiness in your career, and your personal goals. It is easy to overlook the significant impact that will be felt by the most important aspect of the classroom – the children themselves. There are good co-teaching relationships and bad co-teaching relationships. Students can learn in both. Some can even thrive. But what if your goal is to teach students about social and emotional well-being? What if this is your most significant goal as you recognize this as an important foundation for learning and lifelong success? Then you better work on your co-teaching relationship!

What does this mean and what does this look like? There is no “exact” formula for a positive co-teaching relationship. However, just like any relationship – family, friends, partners – there are components that are essential to the success of co-teaching relationships. A co-teaching relationship requires work, clear communication, and feeling safe to speak your voice.

Our co-teaching relationship started out a bit rocky. We struggled to find a good flow to our day and our classroom environment was plagued with social and emotional challenges. Through all of our struggles, we took a great deal of time to reflect on every detail of our day and our interactions with each other and the children. We continued to express our values, questions, and ideas.  Suddenly, everything seemed to click! The children intuitively noticed these changes in our relationship. We modeled for them how we could kindly and candidly voice our opinions and show respect for one another from early on in our partnership.  Neither one of us sacrificed our visions. Instead, we worked together towards a beautiful, joint vision. We were in sync.

The partnership became easier but still required us to spend much of our planning time in deep discussions and reflection of how everything was working (or not) in our classroom. One of the most important aspects was that we were always present with the children and each other. First thing in the morning before discussing business we would ask how we were doing, what was our current mood or state of mind, where were we coming from that particular day and to be empathetic towards our own personal situations to ensure that we could balance each other out that day.  We made it our goal to find joy and have fun even on our most challenging days. Many children would comment on our ability to share tasks and they would see how we often offered help to one another. The children heard us each express our own thoughts and find a way to incorporate what was best for everyone in our classroom community. And guess what? The best part was that the children observed that the one thing we did throughout each day was– LAUGH! Evidence that there is some truth to finding enjoyment in your job!

We recognize that everyone has different co-teaching experiences and hope that you will join our conversation as we delve further into this topic! What are some of your best strategies and experiences from a positive example of a co-teaching relationship? Why did it work so well? How did your relationship impact the children under your care? How can your successes in a co-teaching relationship relate to your various collaborations in other areas of your life? How can it relate to your co-parenting relationship? Comment below to join the conversation.

 

Author: Abby

I am a Mom and have been working in Early Childhood Education for over 10 years. In this time I have simultaneously explored my own personal growth and various educational theories and philosophies. I never found that one approach fit my personal philosophy and instead worked with my co-teacher to create a personal teaching philosophy that reflects my teaching beliefs and experiences.

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