The Many Branches of Early Education Advocacy

The Complexity of Early Education Includes Everyone

It Takes A Village

We have recently found ourselves in the midst of several opportunities to hear from Early Education Advocates or to present our own advocacy ideas. These experiences have encouraged us to have conversations about our role and expectations in this field. Most recently, we had the opportunity to sit on a panel with other professionals in the field and hear from Early Educators who were doing the hard work of brainstorming ways to transform the field that they hold dear to their hearts. This opportunity took place as part of The Empowerment Project, a workshop series hosted by Lisa Guerrero and Ellen Drollette of Positive Spin, LLC. and sponsored by Let’s Grow Kids. This particular series required us to travel, leaving us with time to reflect on the way home. We had a very rich conversation about the problems that are plaguing early childhood education: politics, financial problems, system problems, personnel problems. The list can truly go on. This is when we decided to list ALL of the problems that we could think of in the field. One idea snowballed into another and we began to connect all of the dots. If a parent cannot find care for their young child, they cannot go to work. The employer loses an employee and now must expend additional resources to replace them. The government loses tax payer dollars. In some instances, families may require additional financial assistance. This increases the need for community resources. An increased need in one area of the community might lead to decreased funding in another area affecting others who are accessing that program. Now we have a family who is directly affected, as well as an employer, community agency, government, and community. This is only one scenario. We could easily share others that include missed opportunities to connect families to essential services which could lead to increased need once the child enters the public school system, familial stressors due to financial problems which could lead to increased mental health problems, and more. This is how early childhood care and education becomes EVERYONE’S problem.

While we know that advocating for high quality, affordable early childhood education is important for everyone to participate in, we also recognize that we all have different roles in this task. And it truly is a TASK. So monumental in fact that we often find ourselves wondering where to begin. And we know we are not alone. At our recent events we heard from other early educators who feel frustrated with the systems or overwhelmed by the amount of work to do. We totally understand! It is overwhelming and frustrating. It is HARD work. But even the smallest amount of effort can make a change. Sharing one idea with someone can have a snowball effect, one that will help to counteract the problems incurred by lack of high-quality care.  We have decided to compile some of the issues that early childhood education is facing and will be posting a multi-part series to follow. Our series is not an exhaustive list by any means. We have done some research in an effort to bring awareness to agencies working on these issues.While we know that we will continue to advocate in all aspects of the field, we encourage others to learn more about the issues and start small in advocating for the one that speaks to them. Perhaps you are an educator who is concerned about wages or a parent struggling to find care. There is a saying that goes “Many hands make light work.” This could never be truer than in the work of advocacy. We are in this together and together we will make a change!

 

Author: Abby

I am a Mom and have been working in Early Childhood Education for over 10 years. In this time I have simultaneously explored my own personal growth and various educational theories and philosophies. I never found that one approach fit my personal philosophy and instead worked with my co-teacher to create a personal teaching philosophy that reflects my teaching beliefs and experiences.

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