#MarchForOurLives IS Positive Deviance

This weekend students, parents, educators, and community members all over the country stood up for their rights to feel safe in school as part of the #MarchForOurLives movement. In all of the hashtags, videos, speeches, posters, the things that stands out the most is how incredibly inspiring this generation is.

As parents and educators we are all trying to prepare children to become happy, healthy, and engaged contributors to our democratic country. So what does #MarchForOurLives have to do with early education and care?  Parents – here is where you might be surprised. We practice lockdown drills in preschool and child care. That’s right. Your child’s teacher practices hiding in the classroom and keeping your toddler quiet and happy in case the unthinkable happens. Our most innocent citizens are practicing safety drills for events that most adults cannot wrap their minds around.

There are so many things that we can point to as contributing factors to these tragic events and the problems facing schools these days. Mental health, trauma exposure, our nation’s opioid epidemic, social media, and unlimited access to information. But blame solves nothing. Instead we must act. Many of the recent news stories point to gun control and immediate fixes such as increasing school security. These efforts only provide comfort in the short term that we are doing something to keep our children safe. This is much needed. But what about the long term? That’s when mental health or social and emotional development come into play. The ideal time to teach these skills? Early!

Early educators truly understand the importance of teaching social and emotional skills to young children. The future lies in the hands of our current infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. Research shows that 90% of the brain is fully developed by age five. (Building the Brain, letsgrowkids.org). Early educators practice a multitude of different teaching philosophies that can all contribute positive influences on children. But one aspect that almost every early educator can agree on is that supporting children to develop their Emotional Intelligence is of one of the most important.

Emotional Intelligence is a phrase used to describe the skill set that includes the ability to identify one’s emotions as well as the emotions of others, manage those emotions appropriately (or self regulate), and use those skills to solve social problems and develop relationships. Research shows that children with high emotional intelligence are more successful in school, have better relationships, and lead happier lives.

– Social and Emotional Framework, Hill-Armell & Lambert

Our society, especially at this point in time, is in dire need to revamp our education system with a spotlight on early childhood education. Early educators know what children need to thrive, yet are not always in situations with the appropriate resources to do so.

#MarchForOurLives is a positive movement that came out of tragic circumstances. The students who came together to #MarchForOurLives are just the beginning of a much needed revolution and a reminder that revolutionary vision starts with our children.   Supporting our future generations to be innovative and courageous individuals, like the students in #MarchForOurLives, starts with high-quality early education. High-quality early education provides children with the appropriate tools to form healthy attachments and relationships and to develop positive social and emotional skills, supporting mental health that can alleviate the issues that lead to violence in schools.

The student-led #MarchForOurLives movement proved that children can engage members of their community to join together for a cause. A recent North American Reggio Emilia Alliance (NAREA) workshop highlighted Italian early educators’ focus on helping children to become protagonists. Protagonists were defined as the following: 

The sharing of meanings through gestures and language create a community of mind. The sharing of mind is not merely intellectual but involves an emotional dimension; the children experience a joining of feeling, in the sense of transformation felt by the group of members as a sense of wholeness with others, beauty and harmony, and mutual affinity. The individual does not disappear or recede, however…but rather seeks to count and to be heard, to make a difference, and to achieve influence and recognition in the group through dialogue and negotiation and a (at least partial) sharing of interests and goals–what Italians calling becoming a ‘protagonist’.”   

-Excerpt from Carolyn Edward’s Democratic Participation in a Community of Learners: Loris Malaguzzi’s Philosophy of Education as Relationship, (October, 1995)

The students that started #MarchForOurLives are prime examples of how to be  protagonists. We need to continue to encourage this type of thinking and behavior. Educators and parents can collaborate to create nurturing environments for children that supports their development of Emotional Intelligence.

My revolutionary vision begins with partnering parents and teachers to educate our society on the crucial benefit of providing high-quality early childhood education.  It takes a great deal of time, energy, and reflection to be an educator that allows children to become protagonists. It involves trusting each other, taking risks, and discovering new parts of ourselves.  We are at a time in our nation where it will be essential to provide our future generations with the freedom to come up with new ideas that can propel our society forward. Let’s think about preconceptions of ourselves and who we are as teachers and parents. What is our role? Model how to ask questions with confidence, and then be patient, exhibit trust, and enjoy the process of searching for answers together. We need to allow children to dive into complexity, even if it is a bit scary for us as educators and parents.  We are at a time where we might feel the most divided, therefore look for diverse perspectives to broaden your view. #MarchForOurLives illustrates that while we live in tumultuous times, when children feel empowered to use their voices they can take the lead to make the world a better place. Let’s start talking about how educators and families can come together to teach children social and emotional skills that could help to mitigate future violent acts. 

Comment below to join the conversation.
Ways to get involved and learn more….

Check out Let’s Grow Kids and their advocacy movement

Come to a viewing of The Raising of America hosted by The Junior League of Champlain Valley

Learn more about the importance of early education from Zero to Three

The National Association for the Education of Young Children is working on advocacy and professionalizing the field of early educators

Vermont Early Childhood Advocacy Alliance has information at our local state level

Informative podcasts for those that want to be an Early Childhood Leader

For more information on Social and Emotional Learning visit the Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL)

 

 

 

The Co-Teaching Relationship

Find a job you enjoy doing and you will never have to work a day in your life.”

                                                                       – Mark Twain

Teaching and parenting are incredibly enjoyable. They are both also LOADS of work! If the above quote has you reflecting on your own teaching practice or parenting satisfaction then you are not alone. It is human nature to immediately jump into assessing our own well-being and feelings. We were wired that way for survival. In today’s day and age we are afforded many luxuries and ways of life that allow us to focus less on our survival and more on our contributions to this magnificent world that we are part of. In teaching, this means focusing not just on our own practice, but involving others and really participating in a team, such as in co-teaching.

Co-teaching may be a choice for you or something that your school or childcare center has designed. Either way, you are probably initially thinking about how your co-teaching relationship will impact your ability to do your job, your happiness in your career, and your personal goals. It is easy to overlook the significant impact that will be felt by the most important aspect of the classroom – the children themselves. There are good co-teaching relationships and bad co-teaching relationships. Students can learn in both. Some can even thrive. But what if your goal is to teach students about social and emotional well-being? What if this is your most significant goal as you recognize this as an important foundation for learning and lifelong success? Then you better work on your co-teaching relationship!

What does this mean and what does this look like? There is no “exact” formula for a positive co-teaching relationship. However, just like any relationship – family, friends, partners – there are components that are essential to the success of co-teaching relationships. A co-teaching relationship requires work, clear communication, and feeling safe to speak your voice.

Our co-teaching relationship started out a bit rocky. We struggled to find a good flow to our day and our classroom environment was plagued with social and emotional challenges. Through all of our struggles, we took a great deal of time to reflect on every detail of our day and our interactions with each other and the children. We continued to express our values, questions, and ideas.  Suddenly, everything seemed to click! The children intuitively noticed these changes in our relationship. We modeled for them how we could kindly and candidly voice our opinions and show respect for one another from early on in our partnership.  Neither one of us sacrificed our visions. Instead, we worked together towards a beautiful, joint vision. We were in sync.

The partnership became easier but still required us to spend much of our planning time in deep discussions and reflection of how everything was working (or not) in our classroom. One of the most important aspects was that we were always present with the children and each other. First thing in the morning before discussing business we would ask how we were doing, what was our current mood or state of mind, where were we coming from that particular day and to be empathetic towards our own personal situations to ensure that we could balance each other out that day.  We made it our goal to find joy and have fun even on our most challenging days. Many children would comment on our ability to share tasks and they would see how we often offered help to one another. The children heard us each express our own thoughts and find a way to incorporate what was best for everyone in our classroom community. And guess what? The best part was that the children observed that the one thing we did throughout each day was– LAUGH! Evidence that there is some truth to finding enjoyment in your job!

We recognize that everyone has different co-teaching experiences and hope that you will join our conversation as we delve further into this topic! What are some of your best strategies and experiences from a positive example of a co-teaching relationship? Why did it work so well? How did your relationship impact the children under your care? How can your successes in a co-teaching relationship relate to your various collaborations in other areas of your life? How can it relate to your co-parenting relationship? Comment below to join the conversation.