The Many Branches of Early Education Advocacy

The Complexity of Early Education Includes Everyone

It Takes A Village

We have recently found ourselves in the midst of several opportunities to hear from Early Education Advocates or to present our own advocacy ideas. These experiences have encouraged us to have conversations about our role and expectations in this field. Most recently, we had the opportunity to sit on a panel with other professionals in the field and hear from Early Educators who were doing the hard work of brainstorming ways to transform the field that they hold dear to their hearts. This opportunity took place as part of The Empowerment Project, a workshop series hosted by Lisa Guerrero and Ellen Drollette of Positive Spin, LLC. and sponsored by Let’s Grow Kids. This particular series required us to travel, leaving us with time to reflect on the way home. We had a very rich conversation about the problems that are plaguing early childhood education: politics, financial problems, system problems, personnel problems. The list can truly go on. This is when we decided to list ALL of the problems that we could think of in the field. One idea snowballed into another and we began to connect all of the dots. If a parent cannot find care for their young child, they cannot go to work. The employer loses an employee and now must expend additional resources to replace them. The government loses tax payer dollars. In some instances, families may require additional financial assistance. This increases the need for community resources. An increased need in one area of the community might lead to decreased funding in another area affecting others who are accessing that program. Now we have a family who is directly affected, as well as an employer, community agency, government, and community. This is only one scenario. We could easily share others that include missed opportunities to connect families to essential services which could lead to increased need once the child enters the public school system, familial stressors due to financial problems which could lead to increased mental health problems, and more. This is how early childhood care and education becomes EVERYONE’S problem.

While we know that advocating for high quality, affordable early childhood education is important for everyone to participate in, we also recognize that we all have different roles in this task. And it truly is a TASK. So monumental in fact that we often find ourselves wondering where to begin. And we know we are not alone. At our recent events we heard from other early educators who feel frustrated with the systems or overwhelmed by the amount of work to do. We totally understand! It is overwhelming and frustrating. It is HARD work. But even the smallest amount of effort can make a change. Sharing one idea with someone can have a snowball effect, one that will help to counteract the problems incurred by lack of high-quality care.  We have decided to compile some of the issues that early childhood education is facing and will be posting a multi-part series to follow. Our series is not an exhaustive list by any means. We have done some research in an effort to bring awareness to agencies working on these issues.While we know that we will continue to advocate in all aspects of the field, we encourage others to learn more about the issues and start small in advocating for the one that speaks to them. Perhaps you are an educator who is concerned about wages or a parent struggling to find care. There is a saying that goes “Many hands make light work.” This could never be truer than in the work of advocacy. We are in this together and together we will make a change!

 

Are we Lobbyists? Positive Deviance has a Place in Politics

Meetings with local politicians to talk Early Education

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By now you may have noticed that The Reggio Approach has been a grand inspiration for our pedagogy and philosophy on early education. Part of this is because The Reggio Approach is not exact or permanent. It is fluid, evolving, emerging, and reflective. These principals provide a flexible groundwork to build an ideal setting and community that allow children to thrive. A favorite poem written by Loris Malaguzzi, the founder of The Reggio Approach, titled The 100 Languages is always present in our interactions. The poem, published in its entirety below, encourages us to look at the world through the eyes and experiences of our youngest citizens.    

The Hundred Languages Poem

Early education is more than just teaching kindergarten readiness skills. Early education is about being present and responsive to support the growth of the whole child.  Children truly do have a hundred ways of thinking and a hundred ways of communicating their ideas. This is evident if you have spent any time in a classroom where young children are thriving. And we have to add that ALL children deserve the opportunity to thrive. Unfortunately, in the United States, mounting research shows that we are not investing enough to ensure that this is possible (Check out our blog post here to see the trailer from The Raising of America, a documentary about the early education crisis that our country faces). Staying true to our Positively Deviant ways, we have been stepping out of our comfort zone and challenging ourselves to engage in new experiences that promote awareness of the needs that our most vulnerable citizens face.

On Wednesday we took our first big step outside of our comfort zone. As we walked up in the pouring rain, we laughed and asked “Are these the doors we go in?” Neither one of us ever expected that our passion for early childhood education would take us to the Vermont State House in Montpelier. But now is the time to use our voices to gain political support for investing in high quality and affordable early education for all children in Vermont. Our goal is to push for policies that will create a better system in which all children can flourish with high quality care from professional early educators. Vermont has potential to become the first state to establish a system that can be modeled for the rest of America.

As we entered the heavy doors and were immersed in the hustle and bustle of our local politicians running through the halls of a beautifully architectured building we both felt our nerves and excitement peak. Thankfully we did not have to go it alone – we had some wonderful help from the advocates at Let’s Grow Kids who gave us an unofficial tour and abbreviated lesson to help us prepare for our meetings. We had two meetings set up, one with Senator Claire Ayer (Addison County, VT) and another with Senator Tim Ashe (Chittenden County, VT – President Pro Tempore) We arrived with our fact sheets and talking points, prepared to deliver as much information as would could in a short amount of time. What surprised us the most about our meetings was how receptive and open both Senators were to discussing the issues of early education. Both senators were in agreement of the importance of investing in early childhood education.

Senator Ayer shared her own personal story of helping her children find high quality childcare for her grandchild. She understands the struggle that young families face both in finding care and then affording care. She was excited about the continued support and expansion of funding for CCFAP, Vermont’s Child Care Financial Assistance Program. However, Senator Ayer realizes that this is not enough. We have to look to other solutions to attract and retain professional teaching candidates. We need to look for alternative ways to fund child care, recognizing that it is not just the immediate family who is impacted, but also the businesses in local communities who employ parents. In order to create sustainable written policies that ask for specific funding, we need to ask the right questions and understand the demand for the various types of childcare. Senator Ayer has been recommending that we ask the question “Where are all of Vermont’s children while their parents are at work and are their parents happy with these arrangements?” The Education Committee is currently in the process of securing funds for a Demand Survey to answer just that. The demand survey will inform future policy built around knowing exactly what Vermont’s families need. By the end of our meeting we were feeling much more at ease. The conversation was candid and fluid. We never even pulled out our fact sheets.  

In our small world of advocacy, we had heard that Senator Ashe would be a little more difficult to talk to about the issues facing early education. We went into the meeting feeling over our heads after hearing that he can be intimidating to speak to. All of this quickly faded as we engaged in conversation. Senator Ashe realizes that many current educational expenses for social services in public schools could be mitigated if we could appropriately invest in early care. The Senator also realizes that while Vermont does have potential to create a system for early education, we will need a large overhaul to make it happen. In Vermont we are lucky to have an array of services already available. Although these are dismal in terms of the REAL need, we are ahead of other states in thinking about our youngest citizens and their outcomes. However, the systems that we have in place are old and barely surviving. As Senator Ashe described it, we are putting bandaids on all of these systems. This keeps them alive, but costs us more in the long run. Our solution – we need to begin the difficult conversations of advocating for increased funding for early education so that we can create lasting change.

So, what was Loris Malaguzzi saying when he said “they steal ninety-nine”? It’s not just the ideas that our children are directly taught. By not investing in affordable and high quality early childhood education we are indirectly communicating to our children that we do not value their future and thus stealing their potential to thrive as contributing members of our communities. Educating young children affects everyone in the community, regardless of whether you are a parent. These children are our future citizens of Vermont and of the United States of America.

“We live in a world in which we need to share responsibility. It’s easy to say “It’s not my child, not my community, not my world, not my problem.” Then there are those who see the need and respond. I consider those people my heroes.”

Fred Rogers

The Facts from Let’s Grow Kids:

2018 Stalled County Provider Sheet – Franklin

2018 Stalled County Provider Sheet – Addison

2018 Stalled County Provider Sheet – Chittenden

Ways to get involved:

If you are in Vermont, Let’s Grow Kids is a statewide campaign raising awareness of the early childhood care and education needs that families face    Find the Let’s Grow Kids website here!

Learn more about the importance of early education from Zero to Three

The National Association for the Education of Young Children is working on advocacy and professionalizing the field of early educators

Vermont Early Childhood Advocacy Alliance has information at our local state level

 

We wanted to thank Senator Ayer and Senator Ashe for taking the time to meet with us and for all the work that they do for the State of Vermont. 
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